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the u.s. military is getting ready to take an extraordinary step evacuating troops from the island. >>> and i'm kiran chetry. no relief in sight for homeowners. new numbers showing how weak the housing market is. and even more troubling, analysts said we may not have hit bottom yet. "american morning" starts right now. >>> all right. it is tuesday, march 22nd. a lot of news this morning. again, it's been a wild couple of weeks. >> and it's well into the day in japan. already another two earthquakes today. we're well into the 600s in terms of aftershocks and tremors. more concerns there. >> we're going to bring everybody up to date on that. but first, we're going to start with libya. coalition forces hammering moammar gadhafi's forces and positions as the head of forces in libya said the coalition flew 80 missions yesterday more than half of them by countries other than the united states. also saying that the dictator's momentum has been stopped, at least for now. but in misrata, which is a key city two hours east of tripoli, people are saying that civilians are still being massacre
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
for about 20 countries and includes the west coast of the u.s., hawaii, as well, alaska, as well. >> yeah, i understand, rob, we've been hearing there's a full coastal evacuation in effect in hawaii right now. and we get this sheet and i know you have it too of the coordinates and the estimated arrival time. what does that translate into in terms of waves and what people can expect? and really how much time they have to get out of harm's way? >> well, the pictures that we've been showing, those dramatic pictures where you see water and debris on all sorts of stuff moving rapidly inland, being pushed in like that and tens of miles inland, there was little warning. this is very close to the shoreline, and the epicenter was about 80 miles offshore. so the wave -- the tsunami after the quake happened hit that shoreline about 15 to 20 minutes later. virtually no warning at all. and you get the full force of that impact without any sort of buffer from the ocean. now, as this thing travels across the ocean in all directions down to the south up to the north off to the east, it does begin to lose it
, water, blankets and shelter from the bitter cold. >>> the u.s. government is taking no chances with citizens and troops in japan. it is now telling all americans to stay at least 50 miles away from the crippled nuclear reactor in fukushima. our foreign affairs correspondent jill dougherty is live at the white house with more on what they're recommending to americans that are in japan right now. hey, jill. >> hey, kiran. there's been a lot of change so let's go through it. late last night the state department announcing that they're having what's called a voluntary departure for the families of people who work in three different locations, embassies and consulate and another location in japan, so that is the u.s. embassy in tokyo, the consulate in nagoya and also the fsi, foreign service institute field school in yokohama. those people are being authorized to leave. they're not being forced or ordered to leave. it's voluntary still. state department says that it will have clarter planes available for those people to leave, 3600 if necessary. alsoer this saying those charter plan
of help the united states is prepared to give. hi, chris. >> yeah, just got off the phone with u.s. forces japan saying they have not yet received a formal request from the japanese government. he also said this is a very different mission than what we're used to. he says think of haiti, things like that where we came in and jumped in and started to help. he said every step of the way has to be mapped out and approved by the japanese government. it's a technologically savvy country with a lot of pride. everything has to be formally requested before the u.s. military can act. let's take a look real quick at the map and i can show you a bit about what the u.s. is dealing with here. you can see the plant, there are helicopter crews running relief missions right around in that area. and for a second day, those u.s. helicopter crews came back with low-level contamination of radiation. they had to be soaped down and all their clothes destroyed. and they came up all clean. they're now being told some of the helicopter crews in and around this area are being told to keep their sleeves rolled down,
a nationwide review to see if u.s. plants are vulnerable to the same type of earthquake that hit japan. the indian point station is about 25 miles from new york city has two operating nuclear reactors and it sits right on top of the ramapo fault line. the nrc filed a report uncovering a higher safety risk at the plant than previously thought. and that's gotten the attention of new york governor andrew cuomo, a long-time opponent of indian point. >> the world has changed. reevalua reevaluate. reevaluate and look at the situation and decide whether or not you should grant this facility a license today. with what you know today. >> now, we had a chance to speak with officials from energy corp. on our show last week. they say they welcome a safety review. 27 nuclear reactors, including indian point have been singled out for inspections by the nrc. allan chernoff has been granted exclusive access inside the indian point plant and we'll have his report coming up in the next hour of "american morning." >>> another morning of explosions in tripoli and heavy aircraft fire. as of last night, the
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
upper level winds that actually transport that into parts of kansas, the u.s., and many other places. and before all is said and done, i would not be surprised if you could find trace amounts of this all the way over to europe. but i have to tell you, this is very, very harmless. this is not a big deal. if you're walking out to your car in bright sunlight, chances are you might be exposed to more radiation than that than these particles across the globe. >> it does still, of course, make you think twice when you hear about it. but hearing it's harmless is good. >>> in a few minutes, we'll be talking more about all of this with a disaster expert about containment efforts in japan. he led numerous expeditions into some of the most contaminated areas of chernobyl. >>> to libya now, and rebels getting closer to moammar gadhafi's doorstep gaining ground with new coalition air strikes. nato now says it will take over the entire military mission there, not just the no-fly zone. so far the u.s. has supplied nearly all the fire power according to pentagon figures. the u.s. military has launch
the government forces out. meanwhile, u.s. warships are moving closer to libya as we speak. and this morning, calls for a no-fly zone are getting louder. it's something that the u.s. military would likely take the lead in enforcing. defense secretary robert gates mean, though, setting up a no-fly zone would basically mean war since the u.s. would have to strike libya to take out its air defenses. >>> take a look at the map, a ajdabiya and al brega, capable of landing and a big one, ben wedeman is on the phone from benghazi, libya. ben, you had come close to one of the bombs being dropped. in fact, about 40 yards from you. what schais happening from them >> reporter: what we're hearing, from l bral brega, there have b more air raids. and also this ammunition stock which is providing a lot of the ammunition and weaponry for the rebels who yesterday weren't able to push pro-gadhafi forces out of the day after you mentioned that day long gun battle. i just got off the phone with somebody who lives there, he said the forces are gathering in that town. to,he says, start to push back -- push toward
>>> a lot happening around the world right here at home, as well. let's get you caught up. the u.s. and its allies pounding libya for a third day. 120 cruise missiles and counting. is this going to help keep moammar gadhafi from attacking his own people? >>> smoke rising from a reactor. workers evacuated. and now there are new concerns about radiation in the food supply. >>> and here at home, a major cell phone merger. the number two carrier poised to become number one. what this means to you. let's get started. "american morning" begins right now. >>> good morning, everybody. >> it's monday, march 21st. >> it's great to see all of you this morning. we're following two stories again, but major developments from where we left off on friday. >> breaking news from japan. >> smoke spotted coming from a damaged nuclear reactor. engineers are struggling there to prevent a meltdown after a devastating earthquake and tsunami earlier this month. let's get to anna coren. i understand it's now been evacuated. what's going on there? >> reporter: that's exactly right, ali. they thought they wer
for the assistance. >>> no surprise that the japanese stock market plunged again. at one point the nikkei down 14%. u.s. stocks could fall sharply today. carmen wong-ulrich joins us right now. futures are pointing down. this is a human and an economic disaster. and no surprise, i guess, the stock markets are reacting like this. >> not really. all the markets in asia, all the markets down in asia. and especially, japan's markets. the nikkei closed down 10.2% while the tokyo price index fell 9.5%. and these are the market's largest percentage fall since october 2008 and the third largest on record. now, the losses were reflected across all across the asian markets. there's a selloff in commodities. gold, silver, and platinum. gold is usually a place, a haven where people go in times of stress, but down 1% today after rising more than 1% on monday. and silver fell around 3%. platinum dropped more than 1%. looking to cover market losses. there's also the mounting pressure of lagging demand. these precious metals are used in the manufacturing of chips as well as pollution control devices in cars and trucks.
taliban situation for the u.s. what is the worst case scenario? >> libya has been very strong having its young men go overseas to fight in islamic insurgency, balkans, chechnya, especially ir rack when the height of the fighting was there. those that don't get killed go home. i think the core of the resistance, whatever little military ability they have is probably made up by people elsewhere we would call mujahadeen. so it's a dicey proposition to be getting involved with this. i'm not sure that the opposition, if it takes power, is going to be much better than was gadhafi. >> that's why you need to have the cia, i presume, in there vetting, as we said, who are these people? who are the elements funding or supporting them? who are politically the most palatable and least palatable among them, the white house saying no decision has been made. i have a question for you as a cia veteran, i guess. the fact that we even know about this, is that unusual? should where he just assume the cia in this sort of situation would, of course, be in there on the ground? >> you have to assume the preside
investors in the u.s. as we just discussed, oil prices keep on spiking up another 2.7% yesterday. this is the increase in oil closing at just under $100 a barrel here in the united states. it was higher than that last week, but it has been in that area for a while. as a result of that, take a look at what happened in stock markets. the dow took a big hit, down 168 points. we also heard from federal reserve chairman ben bernanke who expressed concern about the economic recovery if the price of oil keeps climbing. >>> also, democrats south of the border in wisconsin still staying away in illinois. and the governor of wisconsin unveiling his new state budget, which includes cuts to schools and local municipalities. and the protests will continue at the capitol. the governor planned to cut compensation and collective bargaining rights for union work sti ers. cnn's david mattingly is live in madison, wisconsin. any movement on either side? is there any hope of resolving this? or are we seeing more of the same today, david? >> well, kiran, we're approaching the two-week mark of that da
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
has ordered the u.s. of u.s. planes to help evacuate egyptian citizens who fled to tunisia to escape the unrest in libya. >>> also, gadhafi is getting support from hugo chavez who is proposing an international good will commission to mediate libya's crisis. chavez says gadhafi is open to the idea because he wants to show the reality of what's happening inside libya. chavez has accused the u.s. and others blowing the situation out of proportion to justify an invasion. >>> at the bottom of the hour, ben wedeman will have a live report. we'll be checking in with him live from inside libya. >>> moammar gadhafi has blamed the unrest on al qaeda. this morning, the second in command delivered the latest in the series of audio messages concerning the uprisings in the middle east. he saluted those in tunisia and egypt saying the path for freedom is still long. he says america wants a democracy that allows arabs to always be weak next to israel. >>> there's new developments this morning in the labor standoff in wisconsin. a judge has banned protesters from sleeping in the state capitol buildin
to see you. >>> coming up next on "american morning," the u.s. is beefing up its presence in the waters off the coast of libya. we'll have details. hi, dad. we need to talk. [ male announcer ] this intervention brought to you by niaspan. no, it's not about boys. it's about you. mom and i are worried about your health. yes, you're exercising, eating right, but the doctor said it's not enough. he's concerned about the plaque clogging your arteries. the doctor said you have coronary artery disease. he even told you about adding a cholesterol medicine that may help...niaspan. and you've done what? nothing. [ male announcer ] if you have high cholesterol and coronary artery disease, and diet and exercise are not enough, niaspan, along with diet and a bile acid-binding resin, is fda-approved not only to slow down plaque buildup but to actually help clear some of it away. dad, you have always taught me to push myself. now it's time for me to push you. [ male announcer ] niaspan is not for everyone, like people with stomach ulcers, liver, or serious bleeding problems. severe liver damage can oc
. >>> and it may be the biggest about face of his presidency. president obama says the u.s. will resume military trials for terror detainees at guantanamo bay. this move comes after a month-long standoff with a congress over transferring prisoners, including those accused terrorists to u.s. criminal courts. the president on his second full day in office signed an executive order, you may remember, to shut down the military prison within one year, promising to return america to the "moral high ground in the war on terrorism." the president said the administration remains committed, though, to shutting down gitmo. we will be talking about this exactly what it means with jeffrey toobin. >>> also, the prime suspect in the disappearance of natalee holloway is now admitting to killing another woman in peru. dutchman joran van der sloot was accused of killing a woman in a hotel room there in lima last year. his lawyers now say he'll claim temporary insanity. he's going to use something called the violent emotion defense. that would be the equivalent to manslaughter in the u.s. he would get a five-year
in the u.s., oil prices are down today due to less demand from japan. now, japan, here the third largest importer of oil. but overall energy prices could rise should they meet a shift from the nuclear power to natural gas and coal. here's the big impact as toyota, honda, and nissan have all shut down plants due to lelectrical shortages and an inability to export. we'll see a possible shortage of car models, including hybrid models, toyota and honda's hybrids are built in japan. we'll also see higher electronic prices because japan is a huge chipmaker. and if they have problems exporting these, as well, there could be a big disruption in terms of export. >>> also, a lot of things you don't think of, not just the concerns about the market, but also their exports. >> the exports, as well. and some of the markets are okay. overall, it looks even our futures, dow futures are a little mixed. they are down. the market seemed to be very neutral about this right now. >> so much information to still develop. >> could all change tomorrow. >> thank you, carmen. nice to see you. >>> next on "american
life. for a woman in any country, in the u.s., egypt, libya, to come out and say she was raped. no one would do that unless they were raped especially in a conservative society. human rights watch have said girls and women who are survivors of rape are taken to because of the shame associated with rape. and these are centers where the girls and women are held as prisoners basically because -- >> they're not rehabilitated. >> social rehabilitation centers. >> held away from the rest of society. >> they're practically prisoners. >> that's the part that's most amazing. you've told you that sources say she's being held still even though they claim she's been set free. >> her mother and relatives have appeared on television and said that libyan officials have told them if she retracts the story, they'll release her. but gives me hope she's alive. but i won't believe she's alive until i see her. i was a journalist in libya, i went with a group of journalists in 1996, and they kept us in a hotel practically prisoners of gadha gadhafi's ministry of information. and during a news conference bec
situation today if he had nuclear weapons. >> rumsfeld went on to say that he does not support sending u.s. troops into libya. of course, there have been increasing calls for more western intervention, enforcement of a no-fly zone. are these options wise? coming up at 7:40, former undersecretary of state nicholas burns will be joining us. >>> we need to turn right now to our rob marciano with an immediate and developing -- could be a dangerous, rob, weather situation right now. >> yeah, we're looking at several tornado warnings this morning. and a couple of which are right along the i-10 corridor in southwestern louisiana in the new orleans area around lake pontchartrain. several there, st. john the baptist parish, and these include some very populated cities like covington and hammond. these highlighted in the purple, that's where it is. and the storms are moving northeasterly at about 30 miles per hour. if you live in this area, take cover, get inside. the inner core of your home and wait for these storms to pass. a little farther to the north, a couple of tornado warnings across eastern
. and this option is always on the table for the u.s. what is the strategic petroleum reserve? it's this huge collection of crude oil that the united states keeps stockpiled. we've been doing this since 1944, believe it or not, emergency supplies of crude. how much do we have? 727 million barrels. where is it? in underground salt caverns, believe it or not, along the gulf coast. the reserve has been tapped twice. once during the first persian gulf war and once during katrina. we could do it and try to drive prices down a little. the options we have are rolling back the gas tax. you could roll back the gas tax, that could help people out a little bit. they tried this in the '80s, really didn't work. the government price controls, you could do that, we tried that in the 70s. that obviously didn't work, as well. so do i think it's possible they could tap the strategic petroleum reserve? >> no, it's usually something like in times of war if you were to see saudi arabia's supply come off the market, which is a real outlier in terms of all of the risk out there. and remember, gas prices are still b
. >>> well, 40 minutes past the hour now on this "american morning." check this out, u.s. military creating hummingbird-shaped drones. could they actually change the way the u.s. fights wars? >> well, it say prototype, not ready to go just yet, but certainly, fascinating. chris lawrence is in l.a. with more. i just love that preview of seeing that hummingbird fly all around you. how are they makes this work? >> kiran, t.j., this thing is pretty amazing. it moves like an actual living thing and it weighs less, less than a aa battery. imagine this thing perched on a telephone wire, and you can really start to imagine how difficult it would be to even know it was watching you. imagine a drone as small as a hummingbird, same shape, same sound. wait -- don't imagine. it's here. in this california lab. >> it looks more or less like an indigenous small bird and can fly through small clearings and trees. >> reporter: he says this is how the bird sees us from above. right now, the hummingbird can only fly a little longer than ten minutes. but at that size, imagine what it could do in ten hours. the
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22